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20121201
20121231
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the nickname of downtown scotty brown. then to law school, the army national guard, city and state political office where he was one of just five republicans in a body of 40 in the state senate, and then the u.s. senate. senator brown also famously found time to do a little modeling in his youth and it was through this work that he met his wife gail. i've had the pleasure to get to know scott and gail really well over the last three years. they have two daughters and make an absolutely wonderful family. i'm sure gail, hyla and arianna are very, very proud of scott and just as proud as i am to see his tenure here cut short but they should be proud of the fact that scott has accomplished a lot in three short years here in the senate. he led the charge to repeal a burdensome withholding tax that hurt small businesses, he crafted legislation for crowdfunding which allows job creators to raise start-up funds for their businesses over the internet with less red tape and he introduced legislation to ensure that children's hospitals have access to discounts on orphan drugs that are used to treat rar
female members and friends, and all who surround us in our daily tasks. this is no lasting city, we know. may we pass through it with a little more gratitude and with a firmer determination to live the kind of lives we've been called to live. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order, the senate will be in a period of morning business until 3:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. mcconnell: i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new jersey. mr. menendez: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. menendez: mr. president, i rise with a heavy heart at the senseless tragedy in newtown, connecticut, that took place this friday. we're all shaken up from that day, and we ask ourselves why. how could this happen in america? we grope for answers, and i hope we'll
of supervisors of the mayor or the city attorney are somebody and see what his job was like. and what a good thing that was. i remember that. and one of the reasons, architecture that i was in china, but one of the things i thought was great in architecture is in australia, they have changed now, but they built a parliament. and this parliament, whatever architecture reason, it goes up like this. it's huge, and the building goes down almost to the ground and it's covered with grass, the whole ceiling. so what the children, would come in droves in the buses and they would go to the top and they would go down like that. and i thought what a good idea. the association in their mind will be this democratic government of australia, and it has a place where i can go and roll downhill, so they'll have a positive association and it will make you more interested and they will learn about it. so i'm just pointing out there is no single technique, but ultimately it does depend on building the support for this idea. which means explain, which debating, which means discussing, which means the press event
ballooned since the 9/11 attacks. and you're looking at cities that have made up implausible scenarios for terrorist attacks. room to cut? >> guest: i think so, yeah. i'm not an expert in the homeland security area but i'm familiar with the general point and i agree when the federal government starts giving out grants like this, there's lots of room for abuse and made-up roles and made-up responsibilities to try to get federal money. i think that has taken place to some extent in that area and i would take a hard look cutting back. >> host: isabel sawhill, what are you hearing here? >> guest: no one can disagree with the idea we ought to make sure that the government has well-performing programs. i would give the current administration pretty high marks on worrying about that. they have a whole program in place to evaluate programs and where the evidence suggests they're not working, they are trying to cut back or else reform the programs. let me give you an example, the head start program, very popular program, that put use, used as federal money to serve three and 4-year-old kids fro
, genes, experience and a new city private school, and how they related to you and to marty. could you tell that story? >> this is in the 70s. my child, i called him lively. is teachers called him hyperactive. [laughter] and i could expect a call once a month to tell me about my child latest escapade, to come down to see the teacher or the school psychologist, or the principle. and one day when i was particularly weary of sitting in my office, and i said this child has two parents. please alternate calls. [laughter] and it's his father's turn. [laughter] well, marty went down and went to the school, and he faced three stone faces. and what was james' crime? your son stole the elevator. marty's response was, how far could he take it? [laughter] i don't know if it was marty's humor, but as you said, when the school had to alternate calls, calls came once a semester and there was no great improvement in my young son's behavior. but i think people were much more reluctant to call a man away from his work than a woman. >> so you obviously are conscious of your special role as a woman on the
. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is
which you find around the world and even here in the united states. there is no major city in the united states does thaf does not have an element of human trafficking and human slavery within its confines. it's important to understand 35 that it is real, that it is happening. to that extent to remember that there are things we're trying to do here in this sledge legislative body in the united states senate and here in washington to deal with this issue. one of the issues we're going to have a chance to do is reauthorizing the trafficking victims protection act, which was sponsored last year by senator brown and senator leahy and hopefully we can finish that before the end of the year but if we can't i hope early in the next congress we'll address it. there are reports that the state department does, ranks countries around the world on the efforts that they're making to deal with human trafficking and ranks them in three tiers. the third tier being the worst, nations that are not doing enough. one of the things i hope we'll look at is how we reform the process of giving some of these cou
violations. many people have heard of timbuktu but don't know it's a city in northern mali. in a site where extremists have behaved much like the taliban did in afghanistan before 9/11, destroying sacred and religious historic artifacts, imposing a harsh version of sharia that has meant amputations, stoning, violation of women's rights and free speech and religious free exercise rights, fundamentalling changing the tolerance and inclusive history of mali and creating with it a humanitarian crisis as more than 400,000 malians have fled, either internally displaced within mali or going to neighboring countries with refugees. with growing ties between these terrorists and nigeria, libya and throughout the region, aqim we believe may now use its safe haven in northern mali to plan for regional or trans-national terrorist attacks. and just as we should not have ignored developments in afghanistan which seemed a remote and troubled country when the taliban took it over more than a dozen years ago, so, too, we would ignore the chaos in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has rec
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8